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  • U.S. ambassador to the UN calls Salisbury nerve gas attack ‘Russia’s crime’
  • Nikki Haley says VX could be used in New York next if there’s no repercussion
  • March 4 attack in the UK poisoned former Russian spy and his daughter
  • Theresa May announced expulsion of 23 Russian ‘diplomats’
  • She is set to impose sanctions and maybe freeze assets of Russian oligarchs
  • Moscow said it would retaliate if May delivers on threatened ‘punitive’ response
  • Donald Trump voiced support for Britain’s position in telephone call last night
  • White House: U.S. ‘does stand 100 percent with our ally UK on this matter’

America’s ambassador to the United Nations lashed out at Moscow on Wednesday following the March 4 nerve gas attempted assassination of a former Russian intelligence agent and his daughter in Salisbury, England.

Calling the assassination bid ‘Russia’s crime,’ Nikki Haley told the UN Security Council that Vladimir Putin’s government already had a long history of covering for rogue regimes – including Syria’s – that deploy chemical weapons like VX gas against civilians.  

‘Russia failed to ensure Syria destroyed their chemical weapons program. Russia killed the joint investigative mechanism when it found Assad liable for chemical attacks. 

‘Russia used its veto to shield Assad five times last year. It has also provided cover for Syria in the Hague at the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons,’ she said. 

‘The Russians complained recently that we criticize them too much. If the Russian government stopped using chemical weapons to assassinate its enemies, and if the Russian government stopped helping its Syrian ally to use chemical weapons to kill Syrian children, and if Russia cooperated with the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons by turning over all information related to this nerve agent, we would stop talking about them.’ 

The all-out denunciation will be welcomed by Britain’s prime minister, Theresa May, who expelled 23 Russian diplomats earlier in the day as punishment for the attack.

U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley spoke to the Security Council on Wednesday, calling the March 4 nerve gas attack in Salisbury, south-west England, ‘Russia’s crime’

Singled out: Russian Ambassador to the United Nations Vassily Nebenzia was present as Nikki Haley said his country was responsible for the poison attack on a former spy and his daughter

Singled out: Russian Ambassador to the United Nations Vassily Nebenzia was present as Nikki Haley said his country was responsible for the poison attack on a former spy and his daughter

Special relationship: Britain's ambassador to the U.N. Jonathan Allen listened as Nikki Haley said that Russia was responsible for the attack on two British citizens

Special relationship: Britain’s ambassador to the U.N. Jonathan Allen listened as Nikki Haley said that Russia was responsible for the attack on two British citizens

Prime Minister Theresa May, pictured in the Commons, is set to unveil diplomatic expulsions as tensions with Moscow reach levels not seen for decades

Prime Minister Theresa May, pictured in the Commons, is set to unveil diplomatic expulsions as tensions with Moscow reach levels not seen for decades

Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (pictured in Zizzi in 2016) left a trail of nerve agent in the restaurant after their poisoning

Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (pictured in Zizzi in 2016) left a trail of nerve agent in the restaurant after their poisoning

Locals have said chemical weapons experts are removing a potentially contaminated vehicle from a local business

Locals have said chemical weapons experts are removing a potentially contaminated vehicle from a local business

Russia ‘must account for its actions,’ she said, framing the gruesome incident as a case of one Security Council member going rogue against another.

‘If we don’t take immediate concrete measures to address this now, Salisbury will not be the last place that we see chemical weapons used,’ Haley predicted. 

‘They could be used here in New York or in cities of any country that sits on this council. ‘

Deputy White House Press Secretary Raj Shah told reporters aboard Air Force One on Wednesday that ‘as the president said yesterday, it certainly appears to be like Russia, and Russia did commit this act, based on all the evidence that Britain has available.’

‘The president did tell the prime minister on the phone yesterday [that] the United States does stand 100 percent with our ally UK on this matter,’ he added.

Shah said also that he does not know of any independent assessment of the evidence by the United States.

Russia had issued a dark threat of revenge against Great Britain on Wednesday after May announced she was expelling 23 spies in retaliation for the Salisbury attack.

May gave the ‘undeclared intelligence agents’ a week to leave the UK, in the biggest banishment of diplomats in a generation.

She also declared the UK will break off ‘all high level contact’ with Moscow and impose new sanctions, and could seize the lucrative London assets of Vladimir Putin’s cronies.

But within hours Russia had vowed to hit back, saying the measures are ‘absolutely unacceptable’ and warning ‘our response measures will not be long in coming.’

Mrs May, pictured leaving No10 this morning, held a meeting with her National Security Council to discuss the Salisbury attack

Mrs May, pictured leaving No10 this morning, held a meeting with her National Security Council to discuss the Salisbury attack

The threat raised the prospect of a tit for tat escalation from the Russians, and Number 10 is braced for British officials to be expelled from Moscow in retaliation.

The PM announced the tough measures as relations with Moscow slumped a new post Cold War low in the wake of the attack on ex spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

May also suggested that covert reprisals would be undertaken – in an apparent hint at cyber attacks. 

Mrs May – who directly condemned Mr Putin in her statement to the Commons – said she was determined the measures would ‘fundamentally degrade Russian intelligence’ capability in the UK.

‘They have treated the use of this poison with sarcasm and disdain… There is no other conclusion other than that the Russian state was responsible for the attempted assassination of Sergei Skripal and his daughter,’ Mrs May said. 

The carefully-calibrated package was widely welcomed by MPs of all political stripes, although some warned that the government must be ready to step up action again if necessary. 

Russia immediately threatened to hit back in kind. After being notified of the reprisals at the Foreign Office, ambassador to the UK Alexander Yakovenko branded them a ‘provocation’ and ‘unacceptable’ and confirmed there would be expulsions of British diplomats.

And the Russian embassy tweeted that the measures were part of a bid to ‘punish’ Russia under a ‘false pretext’.

It added: ‘We believe it is absolutely unacceptable and unworthy of the British Government to seek to further seriously aggravate relations in pursuit of its unseemly political ends, having announced a whole series of hostile measures, including the expulsion of 23 Russian diplomats from the country.’ 

They added: ‘Needless to say, our response measures will not be long in coming.’

The dramatic escalation of the spat with Russia came as May outlined her plans to MPs in parliament.

Mrs May said: ‘Under the Vienna Convention the United Kingdom will now expel 23 Russian diplomats who have been identified as undeclared intelligence officers – they have just one week to leave.

What action has Theresa May announced against Russia?

The PM today unveiled the fleet of measures being taken against Russia today

The PM today unveiled the fleet of measures being taken against Russia today

Theresa May has announced a fleet of tough measures against Russia in the wake of the poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

They include:

Expulsion of diplomats 

Britain will expel 23 Russian embassy staff who have been identified as ‘undeclared intelligence officers’ from the country within a week.

This is the biggest expulsion of diplomats since 1971 when Ted Heath kicked 90 Soviet staff out after the UK uncovered a large Communist spy ring.

All high-level contacts with Russia will also be suspended in protest. 

New and tougher anti-espionage laws will be brought forward to help degrade Russia’s capabilities in the UK. 

The World Cup: 

Ministers and the Royal Family will boycott the football World Cup in Russia this summer. 

Britain hopes that other allies  will also snub the sporting event . 

Tougher Sanctions: 

Theresa May also signaled that Russian oligarchs wanting to come into the UK and live the high life in London will face tough new checks and sanctions.

The Government will now back amendments to bring in a Magnitsky Law into the UK – which imposes sanctions on Russians found to be linked to corruption or human rights abuses. 

Private plane checks 

While checks on Russian nationals coming to the UK will be stepped up.

This will include increased checks on private flights and extra customs checks.

The UK will also freeze Russian state assets. 

Cyber warfare? 

Mrs May suggested there will be covert action that would not be announced – an apparent hint at cyber attacks.

But this is unlikely to ever be confirmed by the Government officially. 

 

‘This will be the single biggest expulsion in over 30 years and it reflects the fact this is not the first time that the Russian state has acted against our country.

‘Through these expulsions we will fundamentally degrade Russian intelligence capability in the UK for years to come. 

‘And if they seek to rebuild it we will prevent them from doing so.’

The expulsions amount to around 40 per cent of the 58-strong contingent at the Russian embassy.

And it is the biggest expulsion of Russian diplomats since 1971 when Ted Heath kicked 90 out of the country after uncovering a massive spy ring. 

By contrast, just four diplomats were expelled following the murder of Alexander Litvinenko in 2006. 

All high-level contacts with Russia will be frozen, with ministers and the Royal Family boycotting the football world cup in the country this summer. 

In an apparent reference to the activities of Russian oligarchs, Mrs May said there would be tighter checks on those coming to the country. 

She said there could be ‘no place’ for corruption in the UK and the authorities would ‘freeze Russian State assets wherever we have the evidence that they may be used to threaten the life or property of UK nationals or residents’.

Checks on private flights and freight traffic will be stepped up to detect and track those who could endanger the security of the UK.

Mrs May told MPs: ‘Led by the National Crime Agency, we will continue to bring all the capabilities of UK law enforcement to bear against serious criminals and corrupt elites. 

‘There is no place for these people – or their money – in our country.’

She went on: ‘We will also table a government amendment to the Sanctions Bill to strengthen our powers to impose sanctions in response to the violation of human rights.

‘In doing so we will play our part in the international effort to punish those responsible for the sorts of abuses suffered by Sergei Magnitsky.’

Mr Magnitsky was a Russian human rights lawyer who was imprisoned after exposing corruption, beaten up in jail and eventually died in custody.

Calling out Mr Putin by name, Mrs May said: ‘Many of us looked at a post-Soviet Russia with hope. 

‘We wanted a better relationship and it is tragic that President Putin has chosen to act in this way.

‘But we will not tolerate the threat to life of British people and others on British soil from the Russian Government. 

‘Nor will we tolerate such a flagrant breach of Russia’s international obligations.’ 

Ministers are now braced for a tit-for-tat move by Moscow. 

Russian President Vladimir Putin (pictured in Crimea today to celebrated the fourth anniversary of Russia's annexation of it) has mocked Britain over the nerve agent attack in Salisbury

Russian President Vladimir Putin (pictured in Crimea today to celebrated the fourth anniversary of Russia’s annexation of it) has mocked Britain over the nerve agent attack in Salisbury

Investigators in protective suits in the Maltings shopping centre in Salisbury, where former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found critically ill after exposure to a nerve agent, as the investigation into the attack continues

Investigators in protective suits in the Maltings shopping centre in Salisbury, where former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found critically ill after exposure to a nerve agent, as the investigation into the attack continues

Boris Johnson was in Downing Street today for the meeting of the National Security Council

Boris Johnson was in Downing Street today for the meeting of the National Security Council

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson (right) also attended the NSC session in 10 Downing Street this morning

Home Secretary Amber Rudd

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson and Home Secretary Amber Rudd also attended the NSC session in 10 Downing Street this morning

European Council president Donald Tusk said today that the 'brutal' attack could be put on the agenda for a summit next week

European Council president Donald Tusk said today that the ‘brutal’ attack could be put on the agenda for a summit next week

Russian ambassador Mr Yakovenko said tonight: ‘There will be expulsions. As you understand in diplomatic practice, there will be answers from the Russian side.’ 

The Russian embassy to the UK said in a statement: ‘We consider this hostile action as totally unacceptable, unjustified and shortsighted.’

Earlier, Mr Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov said: ‘Moscow has nothing to do with the accident in Britain.

‘Moscow does not accept unfounded accusations that are not based on evidence and a language of ultimatums.’ 

Mrs May met her National Security Council this morning, after winning support from allies including the US, Germany and France for reprisals.

MINISTERS AND ROYAL FAMILY ARE TO BOYCOTT WORLD CUP IN RUSSIA 

Ministers and the Royal Family will boycott the World Cup in Russia in protest at the outrage in Salisbury, Theresa May said today. 

All high-level contacts with Russia have been frozen, including attendance at the football tournament this summer.

The PM said: ‘In the aftermath of this appalling act against our country this relationship cannot be the same.’

Mrs May gave no indication that there will be any attempt to compel the England team to withdraw.

But she said she thought the FA would want to ‘consider their position’ in light of her statement. 

US President Donald Trump vowed to back the UK ‘all the way’ in the stand off when he spoke to Mrs May by telephone last night.

The PM had already secured the backing of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron.

European Council president Donald Tusk said today that the ‘brutal’ attack could be put on the agenda for a summit next week. 

‘I express my full solidarity with PM @theresa_may in the face of the brutal attack inspired, most likely, by Moscow. I’m ready to put the issue on next week’s #EUCO agenda,’ he said.  

Russia had demanded to see samples of the Novichok substance found in Sergei Skripal’s body before it considered responding to Mrs May’s midnight deadline. 

Moscow’s ambassador to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, Alexander Shulgin, accused the UK of ‘fomenting hysteria’.

‘Sooner or later they will have to be held accountable for their lies,’ he said. 

In an extraordinary series of tweets last night, the Russian embassy to London posted threatening messages accompanied by pictures of what appears to be vials of poison.

But UK ambassador Julian Braithwaite told the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva this morning that Moscow’s behaviour was an ‘affront’.

‘The council and the United Nations General Assembly have decried Russia’s violations of international law with alarming regularity,’ he said. 

‘Its reckless behaviour is an affront to all this body stands for.’

A Foreign Office spokesman said: ‘The UK has called for an urgent meeting of the UN Security Council to update Council members on the investigation into the nerve agent attack in Salisbury.’ 

The Russian embassy sent a tweet mocking the plummeting relations between Britain and Russia and warning that they are 'not afraid'

The Russian embassy sent a tweet mocking the plummeting relations between Britain and Russia and warning that they are ‘not afraid’

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in central London on March 13

Russia's President Vladimir Putin in Dagestan on March 13

Prime Minister Theresa May (left) has had her ultimatum dismissed by Vladimir Putin (right) and his officials in Moscow

An officer wearing a protective suit, a gas mask with a hood and rubber gloves inspects evidence in Salisbury last night

An officer wearing a protective suit, a gas mask with a hood and rubber gloves inspects evidence in Salisbury last night

Mrs May received support from across the Commons when she delivered her statement this afternoon. 

But Mr Corbyn was jeered and met with cries of ‘shame’ as he failed to back the PM’s tough stance.

He prompted gasps of disbelief as he parroted the Russian line calling for Britain to share samples of the poison used against Mr Skripal and his daughter Yulia with Moscow to run their own tests.

Timeline of Sergei Skripal’s poisoning

Sunday, March 4th – 4.15pm: Wiltshire Police find a man and woman unconscious on a bench at the The Maltings shopping centre in Salisbury and cordon off the area

Monday, 5th – 11am: Salisbury District Hospital, where the pair were taken, declares a major incident and its A&E department is closed.

8pm: Police officers are first seen outside Mr Skripal’s home in Salisbury

10pm: Police close a Zizzi restaurant near the shopping centre.

Tuesday, 6th –  11.30am: Police also cordon off the Bishop’s Mill pub in Salisbury, where Mr Skripal and his daughter may have gone after leaving Zizzi.

9pm: Firefighters in Hazmat suits are sent to an ambulance base in Amesbury, eight miles away from the scene where they were found.

Wednesday, 7th – 3:30pm: Cordon around Mr Skripal’s house is extended to the top of the cul-de-sac.

Thursday, 8th – 2pm: Police were revealed to have cordoned off the graves of Mr Skripal’s wife and son in Salisbury.

2pm: Police also extend the cordon around Mr Skripal’s home from 50 yards to 150 yards and around the corner.

7.30pm: Police in protective gear go to Ashley Wood Recovery in Salisbury to examine a maroon BMW-3 series, the same car driven by the former spy.

Friday, 9th –10am: Military convoy of 180 troops arrives in Salisbury, including chemical weapons experts, to join the investigation.

3pm: Detectives in Hazmat suits descend on Salisbury cemetery and removed items from Mrs Skripal and her son’s grave. 

Sunday, 11th – The army remove police cars and ambulances thought to have been contaminated.

Monday, 12th – Army close off village of Winterslow and Sainsbury’s car park in Salisbury to remove vehicles.  

And he used the assassination attempt to blast Government cuts to diplomats, while call for a ‘robust dialogue’ with Vladimir Putin.

There was fresh fury after the exchanges when his official spokesman said MI5 could be wrong in blaming Russia because they were wrong about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

Told of the comments, Mrs May said: ‘It is quite wrong and outrageous that the leader of the opposition’s spokesman has made the comments in relation to this that he has.’ 

John Woodcock was among Labour backbenchers who took swipes at Mr Corbyn’s response in the chamber.

Mr Woodcock, a long-term critic of the veteran left-winger, said: ‘This is a day for the House to speak as one for the nation, and (Mrs May) will be reassured to hear that a clear majority of Labour MPs, alongside the leaders of every other party, support the firm stance which she is taking.’

Labour former minister Pat McFadden said: ‘Responding with strength and resolve when your country is under threat is an essential component of political leadership.

‘There is a Labour tradition that understands that and it has been understood by prime ministers of all parties who have stood at that despatch box.

‘That means when chemical weapons are used, we need more than words, but deeds.’

Tory former minister Anna Soubry said: ‘It is noticeable that the length and breadth of this place has completely supported not just the wise words and the leadership of the Prime Minister, but also her firm actions.

‘With the notable exception of the frontbench of the opposition, and that is a shameful moment.’

Tory former minister Mark Francois praised Mrs May’s response as ‘having flashes of the Iron Lady about it’, and said it was ‘in stark contrast to the attitude of the leader of the Opposition’.

He branded Mr Corbyn a ‘CND-badge wearing apologist for the Russian state’.  

Foreign Affairs Committee chair Tom Tugendhat urged Mrs May to ‘use the tools at her disposal to expose the wealth’ of Mr Putin and his family in the wake of the nerve agent attack.  

Mr Tugendhat said he wanted to see more use of ‘unexplained wealth orders’.

‘Could I also ask her if she will use the tools at her disposal to expose the wealth of the Putin family,’ the Tory MP said.

‘Three billion dollars (£2.15billion) or more has been stolen from the Russian people by that man.

Mr Corbyn was jeered and met with cries of 'shame' as he failed to back the PM's tough stance

Mr Corbyn was jeered and met with cries of ‘shame’ as he failed to back the PM’s tough stance

There was fresh fury after the exchanges in the Commons when Mr Corbyn's official spokesman said MI5 could be wrong in blaming Russia because they were wrong about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq

There was fresh fury after the exchanges in the Commons when Mr Corbyn’s official spokesman said MI5 could be wrong in blaming Russia because they were wrong about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq

‘We should expose him for what he is and not be a useful idiot hiding behind legalism of his crimes.’

Liberal Democrat leader Sir Vince Cable added his voice to the calls for more use of unexplained wealth orders.

He said: ‘Can I ask what is her response to the brave leader of the opposition in Russia Alexei Navalny – who is not allowed to stand in the presidential election – who has said that the most effective action the British Government can take is to use its legal powers such as the unexplained wealth orders against named individuals who are critical to the Putin operation. 

‘He names in particular Mr Alisher Usmanov, who has substantial property and sporting interests, and the First Deputy Prime Minister, Mr Igor Shuvalov, who owns, among other things, a £14 million flat overlooking the Ministry of Defence. Will the Prime Minister act?’

Mrs May said: ‘On the unexplained wealth orders, of course those are tools that we do use but we have to use properly in accordance with the rule of law following the due processes that should take place.’

As relations between the two countries hit the lowest point since the Cold War overnight, Nikolai Glushkov, the right-hand man of Mr Putin’s ‘personal enemy number one’, was found dead at his London home.

Investigators in protective suits in the Maltings shopping centre in Salisbury, where former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found critically ill after exposure to a nerve agent

Investigators in protective suits in the Maltings shopping centre in Salisbury, where former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found critically ill after exposure to a nerve agent

He is said to have borne marks of strangulation.  

It was also claimed that Mr Skripal and his daughter might have been poisoned when the nerve agent was smeared on the door handles of their car.  

In its string of messages last night, the Russian embassy feed stated: ‘Moscow will not respond to London’s ultimatum until it receives samples of the chemical substance to which the UK investigators are referring.

‘Britain must comply with the Chemical Weapons Convention which stipulates joint investigation into the incident, for which Moscow is ready.

‘Without that, there can be no sense in any statements from London. The incident appears to be yet another crooked attempt by the UK authorities to discredit Russia.

‘Any threat to take ‘punitive’ measures against Russia will meet with a response. The British side should be aware of that.’ 

Following the call with Mrs Merkel, Downing Street said: ‘They discussed the pattern of aggressive Russian behaviour and agreed it would be important to act in unison with allies to counter it.

US President Donald Trump told Mrs May in a call last night that he was with Britain 'all the way' and demanded Russia provide 'unambiguous' answers

US President Donald Trump told Mrs May in a call last night that he was with Britain ‘all the way’ and demanded Russia provide ‘unambiguous’ answers

French President Emmanuel Macron

The Prime Minister spoke to German Chancellor Angela Merkel tonight to brief her on the attack in Salisbury 

Theresa May has held talks with French President Emmanuel Macron (left) and Angela Merkel on the phone about the Salisbury attempted murder

‘Chancellor Merkel condemned the attack and said she stood in full solidarity with the UK.

‘They agreed that the international community should coordinate closely as the investigation developed and in the wake of Russia’s response.’ 

The former director of Britain’s communications spying agency GCHQ, Robert Hannigan, said her response should include ‘the expulsion of diplomats on a scale we probably haven’t seen since the Cold War’.

Speaking to BBC radio, Hannigan also backed ‘hitting the economic targets’, including Russians doing business in London, but warned against a large-scale cyberattack. 

Senior MEP Guy Verhofstadt offered EU support and said: ‘We stand shoulder to shoulder with the British people.

‘It must be made clear that an attack against one EU & NATO country is an attack on all of us.’  

Sergei Skripal (pictured) and his daughter Yulia have been in a critical condition since they were found unconscious on a bench outside a shopping centre in Salisbury on March 4

Sergei Skripal (left) and his daughter Yulia (right) have been in a critical condition since they were found unconscious on a bench outside a shopping centre in Salisbury on March 4

But Britain will need to get support from the UN and Nato allies in order to impose sanctions that will really bite and be felt by the Kremlin.

The PM dramatically pointed the finger at Putin for the poison attack on Monday, saying it was’highly likely’ it was linked to Russia.

Branding the attack a ‘reckless and despicable act’, Mrs May said the substance used was a ‘military grade’ agent Moscow has produced.

Together with Russia’s previous actions and tactics, including the killing of Alexander Litvinenko, the UK authorities concluded it was ‘highly likely’ to be involved in the episode. 

Mrs May said the government would not accept such an attempt to ‘murder innocent civilians on our soil’. 

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said allies are mobilising to support the UK and hit back at Russia. Speaking yesterday, he said: ‘I’ve been very encouraged so far by the strength of the support that we are getting.

Police have put a forensics tent over the parking meter outside Salisbury's Sainsbury's store amid fears it was used by Sergei Skripal

Police have put a forensics tent over the parking meter outside Salisbury’s Sainsbury’s store amid fears it was used by Sergei Skripal

Vladimir Putin said in a Russia TV interview he could forgive nearly everything, but not 'betrayal' - but the Kremlin has denied plotting to kill Sergei Skripal

Vladimir Putin said in a Russia TV interview he could forgive nearly everything, but not ‘betrayal’ – but the Kremlin has denied plotting to kill Sergei Skripal

‘I think in particular from President Macron of France, I talked to Sigmar Gabriel my German counterpart, and from Washington where Rex Tillerson last night made it absolutely clear that he sees this as part of a pattern of disruptive behaviour, increasingly disruptive behaviour, malign behaviour by Russia, the reckless use of chemical weapons, the support for the reckless use of chemical weapons which stretches from Syria now to the streets of Salisbury.

‘I’ve been encouraged by the willingness of our friends to show support and solidarity.’ 

Whitehall sources said they were accelerating their offensive cyber programme and could hit select targets for a specific effect. 

It is understood this could see a specialist cyber unit deployed in the UK to attack Kremlin computer networks spewing Russian propaganda and trolling factories spreading fake news. 

General Sir Chris Deverell, commander of Joint Forces Command, has revealed how the UK has a specialist unit which is dedicated to ‘offensive cyber’ run jointly by the MoD and GCHQ.

So far it has worked on Islamic State but this could be expanded towards Russia.

In an interview with the Mail last week, he said the military could hit back at disinformation spread by Russian trolling factories. 

He said: ‘There are two ways you could respond. One is putting your own messages out to compete with the messages that actors like that are sending. And the other is with a cyber-attack.

‘Whether or not you could use cyber as a weapon would depend upon the specific circumstances and the law.’ He said that there was a specific capability in which troops tackle mistruths spread by enemies. 

Another option is for the Government to implement a British version of the US’s Magnitsky Act, which lists Russians involved in corruption and human rights abuses, banning them from entering the country.  

The Kremlin was given a deadline of midnight to respond to the evidence, but has refused to do so. 

Doubts were raised about the US’s backing yesterday when Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was sacked hours after condemning Russia.

However, it appears the axing of Mr Tillerson was unrelated and Mr Trump has now offered his support.      

Nikki Haley: nerve gas attack on spy in Britain is Russia’s crime

Nikki Haley told the United Nations Security Council Wednesday that the U.S. stands firmly behind the United Kingdom after the poison attack on  ex spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury, Wilts. Here is what she said:

No two nations enjoy a stronger bond than that of the United States and the United Kingdom. 

Ours is truly a special relationship. when our friends in Great Britain face a challenge, the United States will always be there for them. Always. 

Alone, Russia’s crime is worthy of this council’s action. But this is not an isolated incident. 

The assassination attempt in Salisbury is part of an alarming increase in the use of chemical weapons. 

Last year the North Korean regime used the nerve agent VX to publicly assassinate Kim Jong-Un’s brother in a Malaysian airport.

In Syria, the Assad regime continues to kill its own people with chemical weapons years after this council passed resolutions 2118 to remove the threat from Syria’s chemical weapons program. 

Russia's crime: U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley delivers verdict

Russia’s crime: U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley delivers verdict

When the Security Council created a mechanism to investigate chemical weapons attacks, that mechanism was targeted when it began to shine a spotlight on Assad’s role in killing his own people. 

A growing concern in all of this dangerous and destabilizing activity is Russia. Russia failed to ensure Syria destroyed their chemical weapons program. 

Russia killed the joint investigative mechanism when it found Assad liable for chemical attacks. Russia used its veto to shield Assad five times last year. 

It has also provided cover for Syria in the Hague at the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. 

The Russians complained recently that we criticize them too much. 

If the Russian government stopped using chemical weapons to assassinate its enemies, and if the Russian government stopped helping its Syrian ally to use chemical weapons to kill Syrian children, and if Russia cooperated with the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons by turning over all information related to this nerve agent, we would stop talking about them. 

We take no pleasure in having to constantly criticize Russia. 

But we need Russia to stop giving us so many reasons to do so. Russia must fully cooperate with the UK’s investigation and come clean about its own chemical weapons program. 

Russia is a permanent member of the Security Council. It is entrusted in the United Nations charter with upholding international peace and security. It must account for its actions.

If we don’t take immediate concrete measures to address this now, Salisbury will not be the last place that we see chemical weapons used. They could be used here in New York or in cities of any country that sits on this council. This is a defining moment. 

Time and time again member states say they oppose the use of chemical weapons under any circumstance. Now one member stands accused of using chemical weapons on the sovereign soil of another member. 

The credibility of this council will not survive if we fail to hold Russia accountable. Thank you.

The investigation into the poisoning has led to a series of locations around Salisbury being sealed off and decontaminated

Soldiers in Hazmat suits closed down a village near Salisbury yesterday as they removed a recovery truck thought to have towed Mr Skripal's car from the scene

Soldiers in Hazmat suits closed down a village near Salisbury yesterday as they removed a recovery truck thought to have towed Mr Skripal’s car from the scene

‘You’re a disgrace to your party!’ Fury as Corbyn says he does not TRUST security services’ evidence that Russia is to blame for spy nerve agent attack 

Jeremy Corbyn was today branded a ‘disgrace’ after he failed to condemn the Kremlin and suggested Russia might not be behind the Salisbury poisoning.

The Labour leader was jeered and met with cries of ‘shame’ as he stood up in the Commons and failed to back Theresa May’s tough stance against Russia.

He prompted gasps of disbelief as he parroted the Russian line calling for Britain to share samples of the poison used against Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia with Moscow to run their own tests.

And he used the assassination attempt to blast Government cuts to diplomats and call for a ‘robust dialogue’ with Vladimir Putin.

Jeremy Corbyn, pictured with his communications chief Seumus Milne, a former Communist who has downplayed the number of people imprisoned under Stalin's murderous rule. the coterie of Marxist advisers who surrund the Labour leader has raised questions about his response to the poison spy plot

Jeremy Corbyn, pictured with his communications chief Seumus Milne, a former Communist who has downplayed the number of people imprisoned under Stalin’s murderous rule. the coterie of Marxist advisers who surrund the Labour leader has raised questions about his response to the poison spy plot

He sparked fresh fury after his official spokesman said MI5 could be wrong in blaming Russia because they were wrong about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

The PM tore into the Labour leader for failing to condemn Moscow despite all the evidence pointing to Russian state involvement in the murder attempt. 

Tory Business Minister Claire Perry shouted across the Chamber to the Labour leader: ‘You’re a disgrace to your party.’

Mr Corbyn’s spokesman tried to cast doubt over the Government’s assertion that Russia is behind the attack.

He said: ‘In these times of crises initial reaction is not necessarily backed by reality and fact.

Labour MP Pat McFadden (pictured in the Commons today) took a stinging swipe at Mr Corbyn, saying: 'Responding with strength and resolve when you're country is under threat is an essential component of political leadership....there is a Labour tradition which understands that.'

Labour MP Pat McFadden (pictured in the Commons today) took a stinging swipe at Mr Corbyn, saying: ‘Responding with strength and resolve when you’re country is under threat is an essential component of political leadership….there is a Labour tradition which understands that.’

‘Jeremy has been proved to make the right call time and time again.

He added: ‘There is a history between WMDs and intelligence which is problematic.’

The PM said she was ‘surprised and shocked’ at the statement, which was repeated to her in the Chamber.

In a fiery exchange in the House of Commons today, Mr Corbyn was condemned by the Prime Minister, many Labour MPs and Tories for failing to strike the right tone on the Salisbury poisoning.

Labour moderates queued up to publicly back the PM’s action and to take stinging swipes at their own pacifist leader.

Labour MP Pat McFadden said: ‘Responding with strength and resolve when you’re country is under threat is an essential component of political leadership….there is a Labour tradition which understands that.’ 

‘Paralysis, convulsions, you can’t breathe and after that you die’: Scientist who helped create the lethal nerve agent Novichok used to attack Russian spy in Salisbury reveals its terrifying effects

The Russian whistleblower who exposed the country’s secret chemical weapons programme has revealed the horrific effect of the Novichok nerve agents on their victims.

Vil Mirzayanov described the use of the lethal toxins as a ‘brazen’ attack by Vladimir Putin, who ‘thinks he can use everything to kill enemies’.

Mr Mirzayanov says a large dose of Novichok ‘paralyses’ victims before ‘it causes convulsions, you can’t breathe and after that you die’.

Vil Mirzayanov (pictured) described the use of the lethal toxins as a ‘brazen’ attack by Vladimir Putin, who ‘thinks he can use everything to kill enemies’

Vil Mirzayanov (pictured) described the use of the lethal toxins as a ‘brazen’ attack by Vladimir Putin, who ‘thinks he can use everything to kill enemies’

The exiled scientist shocked the world in 1992 when he revealed that promises by the Soviet Union to reduce its chemical weapon stockpiles were hollow.

He worked in the top-secret Moscow laboratory where a new generation of even more potent poisons was being perfected.

These gruesome chemical weapons, named ‘Novichok’ after the Russian for ‘newcomer’, were designed to be even more lethal than VX or sarin.

At the time, one former top Soviet military adviser described them as ‘political weapons’, adding: ‘They have a powerful moral and psychological effect.’

Shockingly, they can be created from common, unrestricted and undetectable industrial and agricultural chemicals available worldwide.

Vil Mirzayanov described the use of the lethal toxins as a ‘brazen’ attack by Vladimir Putin (pictured), who ‘thinks he can use everything to kill enemies’

Vil Mirzayanov described the use of the lethal toxins as a ‘brazen’ attack by Vladimir Putin (pictured), who ‘thinks he can use everything to kill enemies’

As a result, weapons inspectors fear other rogue nations, including Syria and North Korea, could have their own lethal stockpiles of the powerful nerve agents.

Speaking from his home in New Jersey, Mr Mirzayanov, 83, described the top-secret laboratory as a ‘criminal enterprise’.

‘It’s a brazen attack,’ he said. ‘Putin thinks he can use everything to kill enemies. They don’t tolerate any opponents.

‘They should be punished. It’s an open demonstration of this Russian terrorism.

‘The Russian government is telling people who are thinking about revealing more secrets that they can expect the same fate.’

Asked how the nerve agent works, he added: ‘It’s for paralysing people, it causes you convulsions and you can’t breathe and after that you die. If you get enough of a dose of it.

‘It’s real torture, it’s impossible to imagine. Even in low doses the pain can go on for weeks. You cannot imagine the horror, it’s so bad.’

The Novichok family of nerve agents were secretly developed over two decades at a research facility 50 miles outside the Russian capital.

Many times more potent than other better known chemical weapons, Novichok agents can render gas masks and protective equipment useless.

One of the few labs capable of producing a nerve agent like that used in the attack on a Russian double agent in the UK is in Russia's foreign intelligence headquarters, it was claimed today

One of the few labs capable of producing a nerve agent like that used in the attack on a Russian double agent in the UK is in Russia’s foreign intelligence headquarters, it was claimed today

Sometimes described as ‘gases’ they are in fact liquid, intended to be delivered as a fine spray.

A series of poisons, known as Novichok 5, 7, 8 and 9 to identify them, were produced amid conditions of complete secrecy.

They all kill the same way. By inhibiting enzymes that control nerve receptors in the brain.

One expert said victims simply ‘forget to breathe’. A tiny drop, almost undetectable, placed on the skin or inhaled can cause death within minutes.

Describing his work, Mr Mirzayanov said: ‘They were normal laboratories, they were not underground or anything. They were testing and developing.

‘There were around 1,000 people working on this, it was a big deal. You have to test it on animals and after that you have to study the chemical properties… so many laboratories were involved.’

In 1987, one physicist at the laboratory was saved despite being exposed to the chemical when a ventilator stopped working. Witnesses described how he staggered out of the room, describing seeing bright hallucinations before collapsing and being rushed to hospital by the KGB. He was left with permanent injuries after being critically ill for ten days and unable to walk for six months.

Last night experts described nerve agents such as Novichok as second only to the ‘atom bomb’ as the most deadly weapons ever made. They said that because the ingredients were so common, the poison was ideal for use in an assassination, as well as a weapon of mass destruction.

Pharmacology expert Professor Gary Stephens said: ‘This is a more dangerous and sophisticated agent than sarin or VX and is harder to identify. It causes a slowing of the heart and restriction of the airways, leading to death by asphyxiation.

‘One of the main reasons these agents are developed is because their component parts are not on the banned list. It means the chemicals that are mixed to create it are much easier to deliver with no risk to the health of the courier.’

Professor Robert Stockman, of the University of Nottingham, said traces of nerve agents did not linger. He added: ‘These agents react with water to degrade, including moisture in the air, and so in the UK they would have a very limited lifetime. This is presumably why the street in Salisbury was being hosed down as a precaution – it would effectively destroy the agent.’

Military personnel in chemical suits searching  the car park behind Salisbury Police Station

Military personnel in chemical suits searching the car park behind Salisbury Police Station

Russia went into denial early today, with a former FSB chief claiming scientists at Porton Down had poisoned ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

A top Moscow chemical weapons expert echoed the charge while also alleging nerve agent novichok did not exist.

Moscow was scrambling today to respond to Theresa May’s demand for an explanation for the Salisbury attack by midnight.

In an extraordinary blast, Vladimir Putin’s predecessor as FSB secret service chief Nikolay Kovalyov claimed Porton Down government laboratory – which identified Russian-made novichok as the agent that poisoned the Skripals – was likely to have been behind the attack.

‘There is a laboratory (near Salisbury), which is famous all over the world,’ he dismissively told Britain.

‘Check if anything leaked from there.’

Soldiers in Hazmat suits yesterday loaded up and removed an ambulance believed to have taken Miss Skripal to hospital

Soldiers in Hazmat suits yesterday loaded up and removed an ambulance believed to have taken Miss Skripal to hospital

Meanwhile, chemical weapons scientist Dr Anton Utkin – a former UN inspector in Iraq – denied the existence of novichok, and echoed the claim that Britain maybe responsible for the poisoning.

He led the destruction of chemical weapons in Russia.

‘I was dealing with elimination of Russian chemical weapons and with all the responsibility I can say that we have never had a weapon under this name,’ he said.

Actually, it is very strange that British experts have found out the formula of this ‘super secret’ poison nobody knows about. It is not clear either how they managed to determine that it was produced in Russia.

‘If you know the technology, it is not possible to find out who made a chemical weapon – if the method is the same, the formulas of the substances will be identical. So this news only provokes more questions.’

Utkin said the West had earlier made a ‘toxic noise’ about Russia’s alleged use of chemical weapons in Syria.

‘And now right in the heart of Great Britain this traitor is killed with a neuroparalytic substance.

‘All this happens at a very convenient time – before the Russian presidential election and World Cup. If I were British, I would not blame Russians but check my own security systems first.

‘Something strange is happening there – it is not the first time when criminals are walking around the country with highly toxic and radioactive substances and the secret services have no idea about it.’

A police car was loaded up to be removed yesterday as the Army and emergency services continue the clean-up operation

A police car was loaded up to be removed yesterday as the Army and emergency services continue the clean-up operation

Dr Utkin has worked for the State Scientific Research Institute of Organic Chemistry and Technology which is suspected of being behind the development of novichik starting in 1973.

Kovalyov, now an MP, said the accusations by May were a ‘provocation’ against Russia.

There was no sense for Russia seek to kill a spy convicted 12 years ago when the publicity would damage the campaign for the presidential election, he said.

‘Just be logical. There is no logic here,’ he said. ‘England is turning into a dangerous country.’

‘If I were to speak for the Ministry for Foreign affairs, I would have issued a statement that would not recommend our spies and traitors to live there because it is dangerous to these citizens,’ he said. ‘The chain is already rather long.’

–Credit: Home | Mail Online