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  • Yulia Skripal has made her first phone call since was poisoned in Salisbury attack
  • Her father and former spy Sergei Skripal, 66, is also far better than was believed
  • The call came today to Mr Skripal’s niece, who is seeking a visa to come to Britain
  • Viktoria Skripal is convinced call was from Yulia, 33, now in hospital in Salisbury

Will Stewart In Moscow

and
Svetlana Skarbo For Mailonline

Yulia Skripal has made her first phone call since was poisoned with a nerve agent and says she plans to leave hospital soon, her cousin claims.

The 33-year-old’s father and former spy Sergei Skripal, 66, is also far better than was believed.

The call came today to Mr Skripal’s niece, who is seeking a visa to come to Britain and visit her stricken relatives.

Viktoria Skripal, 45, is convinced the call was from Yulia, who is now in hospital in Salisbury.

Viktoria Skripal, 45, is convinced the call was from Yulia, 33, now in hospital in Salisbury

Viktoria Skripal, 45, is convinced the call was from Yulia, 33, now in hospital in Salisbury

Yulia Skripal (left) has made her first phone call since was poisoned with a ‘weapons-grade nerve agent’ – and says she plans to leave hospital tomorrow, says her cousin Viktoria (right)

Yulia (pictured left) and her father Sergei remain in hospital after a never agent attack in Salisbury four weeks ago 

Yulia (pictured left) and her father Sergei remain in hospital after a never agent attack in Salisbury four weeks ago 

Yulia (pictured left) and her father Sergei remain in hospital after a never agent attack in Salisbury four weeks ago 

She strongly denied that it could be a hoax. MailOnline has a transcript of the call obtained from Viktoria.

MailOnline has no way to independently verify it but Viktoria insisted she is convinced she was talking to Yulia.

If true, the sensational revelations mean that both the Skripals are far healthier than previously believed from hospital statements.

Viktoria said: ‘It is a feeling of enormous relief to hear from her.’ 

Below is a transcript of the call, made today at 12.31pm Moscow time; 10.31am UK time.

The pair speak cautiously in Russian on the phone.

Victoria: Allo? (hello?)

Yulia: Hello! (then a garbled sentence) I’ve got your number, is this the best one to call?

Yulia: Hello?

Victoria: Hello?

Yulia: Hello, do you hear me? Victoria’s voice: I do

Yulia: This is Yulia Skripal

Victoria: Oh Yul’ka… ! (tender, friendly for Yulia) Dear god this is you! I hear by your voice that this is you, but I can’t get it! (her voice stumbles) is this, is this, were you given this phone, is that right?

Yulia: Yes, yes, yes

Victoria: Oh thank heavens…. Dear God… Yulyash (fond name), you are…. is everything ok with you?

Yulia: Everything is ok, all’s well

Victoria: Look, if I am granted a visa tomorrow, I’ll fly to see you on Monday. So, well

Yulia (interrupting, calmly): No-one will give you a visa, Vika

Victoria: Ah well… well, I was also thinking that. That’s it. Whatever. Won’t they, yes? Anyway, if I am given a visa I need you to say ‘Yes’ when you are asked if you wish to see me

Yulia: I think no, here the situation is now…we’ll deal with it later

Victoria, at the same time: That’s it, I know, yes, I know everything

Yulia: Later, yes, we better sort it all later. Everything is good, and then later we’ll see what we see, we’ll sort things as we get to them

Victoria: Is this your number?

Yulia: No, it’s a temporary one

Victoria: Got it, ok

Yulia: In other words, everything is normal, we’ll see it all later as we go along. You know what kind of situation is here.

Victoria: Me… I… I…

Yulia: Everything’s fine

Victoria: Ok, yes, ok, ok

Yulia: Everything is fine, everything is solvable, everyone is getting better, everyone is alive

Victoria: Got you. Is papa all ok? Yulia?

Yulia (small pause): Everything is normal, he is resting now, sleeping, everyone’s health is normal, no irreversible things happened

Yulia (continues): I am checking out soon. Everything’s ok!

Viktoria: That’s fine, kisses to you, Zaichik (little hare, a very tender word to address loved ones and dear family members) that’s it, see you

Yulia: Yes, see you, bye.

The call is only 1 minute 47 seconds. The voice purporting to be Yulia sounded weak and tense. 

Last week, the Russian Embassy seized upon reports that Yulia Skripal is conscious to demand that its remaining diplomats in London are allowed to see her.

Britain is fighting an information war with the Kremlin after Theresa May accused Russia of being behind the nerve agent attack on Sergei Skripal and his daughter.

Britain may now be forced to let agents of the Russian state visit the citizen the country is accused of attempting to murder. 

Yulia is said to be conscious and talking after the attack, but her father Sergei is still in a coma.

Meanwhile, one of Mr Skripal’s friends has said he believes he is being kept alive by life support machines.

The development could prove key to the investigation into the attack – as it may mean Ms Skripal could soon be able to tell police about the moments before she and her father collapsed in a park.

She could also potentially identify whoever carried out the attack – which is now thought to have taken place at Mr Skripal’s suburban home.

Russia has demanded to see Yulia Skripal, the daughter of double agent Sergei Skripal

Russia has demanded to see Yulia Skripal, the daughter of double agent Sergei Skripal

Russia has demanded to see Yulia Skripal, the daughter of double agent Sergei Skripal

The Metropolitan Police believe Mr Skripal and his daughter, who was visiting him from Russia, first came into contact with the deadly chemical at his home in Salisbury.

Detailed forensic testing revealed the highest concentration of Novichok was found on the front door.

This morning it was reported that security services located the source of the nerve agent used to poison Mr Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

According to reports, officials found the Russian laboratory where the Novichok poison was made in the days after the attack on March 4. 

But this comes after the chief of the Ministry of Defence’s Porton Down laboratory said it had ‘not verified the precise source’ of the nerve agent – prompting a furious backlash from Russia.

The admission was seized upon by President Vladimir Putin who demanded an apology from Britain. 

Sergei Skripal with his daughter Yulia before they were poisoned in Salisbury

Sergei Skripal with his daughter Yulia before they were poisoned in Salisbury

Sergei Skripal with his daughter Yulia before they were poisoned in Salisbury

Gary Aitkenhead, the chief executive of the Porton Down defence laboratory (pictured), has said it has 'not verified the precise source' of the Novichok nerve agent 

Gary Aitkenhead, the chief executive of the Porton Down defence laboratory (pictured), has said it has 'not verified the precise source' of the Novichok nerve agent 

Gary Aitkenhead, the chief executive of the Porton Down defence laboratory (pictured), has said it has ‘not verified the precise source’ of the Novichok nerve agent 

A Whitehall source told The Times: ‘We knew pretty much by the time of the first Cobra [the emergency co-ordination briefing that took place the same week] that it was overwhelmingly likely to come from Russia.’

Despite the blunders, the EU yesterday insisted it retained ‘full confidence’ in the UK’s investigation of the Salisbury nerve agent attack and said Russia was to blame.

Brussels issued a strong statement in support of Britain as ministers scrambled to shore up the international coalition standing against the Kremlin.  

Britain branded the plea for an apology from Russia ‘perverse’ and ministers hit out at the Russian claims.

Security minister Ben Wallace told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that there is ‘no missing nerve agent that no-one can find’ when asked about comparisons to the Iraq War.

He said there was ‘no doubt that we have found nerve agent’. 

He also said Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had seen more intelligence ‘than the average backbench MP’ because he had received a Privy Council briefing on the matter.

But Mr Wallace added: ‘The circle of who gets to see very sensitive information is very small because if you leak it or it gets out, people’s lives are put at risk.’ 

Mr Skripal and his daughter (left) stand outside the front door with another relative during a previous visit she made to the UK

Mr Skripal and his daughter (left) stand outside the front door with another relative during a previous visit she made to the UK

Mr Skripal and his daughter (left) stand outside the front door with another relative during a previous visit she made to the UK

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson (pictured at the Lord Mayor's Banquet last week) was under fire  after he previously claimed Porton Down scientists had given him 'absolutely categorical' evidence the Novichok used to poison Sergei Skripal had come from Russia

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson (pictured at the Lord Mayor's Banquet last week) was under fire  after he previously claimed Porton Down scientists had given him 'absolutely categorical' evidence the Novichok used to poison Sergei Skripal had come from Russia

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson (pictured at the Lord Mayor’s Banquet last week) was under fire after he previously claimed Porton Down scientists had given him ‘absolutely categorical’ evidence the Novichok used to poison Sergei Skripal had come from Russia

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson was under fire yesterday after he previously claimed Porton Down scientists had given him ‘absolutely categorical’ evidence the Novichok used to poison Sergei Skripal had come from Russia.

Putin has denied responsibility and demanded access to the British investigation into the March 4 attack on former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.  

Foreign Office Minister Alistair Burt condemned Russia’s ‘brazen use of a chemical weapon on UK soil’ in a speech. 

The Metropolitan Police believe Mr Skripal and his daughter, who was visiting him from Russia, first came into contact with the deadly chemical at his home in Salisbury.

Detailed forensic testing revealed the highest concentration of Novichok was found on the front door.

As the meeting gathered, the UK delegation to the Organisation for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons branded Russia's decision to call an extraordinary meeting of the body's executive council to discuss the Salisbury poisoning 'perverse'

As the meeting gathered, the UK delegation to the Organisation for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons branded Russia's decision to call an extraordinary meeting of the body's executive council to discuss the Salisbury poisoning 'perverse'

As the meeting gathered, the UK delegation to the Organisation for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons branded Russia’s decision to call an extraordinary meeting of the body’s executive council to discuss the Salisbury poisoning ‘perverse’

The attempted murder investigation is continuing and, as a precautionary measure, police placed a cordon around a children’s play area at nearby Montgomery Gardens.

Britain has accused Russia of being behind the poisoning – allegations fiercely denied by Moscow.

In turn, Russia has suggested that UK intelligence officers may have been involved in the poisoning.

The Kremlin allegation came as Moscow faced increasing global isolation, with at least 26 countries expelling a total of more than 130 suspected spies.

Britain insists there is no plausible alternative explanation for the attack and has dismissed the series of suggestions emanating from Moscow as nonsense.

More than 250 counter-terrorism detectives continue to work on one of the biggest investigations since the July 7 attacks in London in 2005.

Officers are trawling through more than 5,000 hours of CCTV.

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